Public sector agencies

  • Booking an interpreter

    Phone

    For long appointments or special situations, book a professional telephone interpreter here.

  • Contact Language Line

    Language Line has an enthusiastic team ready to help with questions, resources and training.Language Line logo

  • The role of the Office of Ethnic Affairs in the workplace

    A group of ethnically diverse work colleagues

    By 2021 a quarter of the New Zealand workforce is expected to have been born overseas.

    This ethnic diversity offers huge opportunities to our economy, offering a rich resource of experience, skills and overseas connections which can add to New Zealand’s wealth

    The Office of Ethnic Affairs is working to unlock this potential to help build economic growth. We provide practical advice and support to ethnic people in the business sector and work with other government agencies to provide equal access to government services.

  • Ethnicity Matters - a guide to working with ethnic communities

    Anjena and Chamain Singh from Waikato

    This is a guide intended to help public sector organisations work with and respond to the needs of ethnic communities.

    It provides simple, easy and practical advice for policy staff about how to incorporate ethnic perspectives into the work of government. 

     Ethnicity Matters (PDF 524kb)

  • Ethnicity data

    People from more than 200 different ethnicities live in New Zealand.

    Download this statistical snapshot (pdf) of New Zealand’s diversity.

    Whereabouts do people from ethnic communities live? What languages are spoken? What is the unemployment rate among ethnic communities? What health problems are an issue?

    Find out in our collection of data about ethnic people living in New Zealand.

    While Statistics New Zealand and other agencies collect a vast array of facts and figures, this is the first time that those applicable to ethnic people have been brought together in one place.

  • Director's Update - March 2018

    Image of Cathrine Austin (Austin) Director of the Office of Ethnic Communities

    Tēnā koutou katoa

    A month into my role as Acting Director, Office of Ethnic Communities, I already feel at home here. The support and dedication of the hard-working team of professionals at the Office has played a big part in this, for which I am very grateful.

  • Wellington Council consults on te reo Māori

    Image of the consultation document with a waka on the harbour on the bottom of the document.

    On Waitangi Day, Wellington City Council announced a consultation on how the city uses and recognises te reo Māori.

    The consultation follows a promise Mayor Justin Lester made during te wiki o te reo Māori (Māori language week), when he said Wellington would work towards becoming a te reo Māori city.

  • Rescuing the Old Stone House in Canterbury

    Image of the Old Stone House in Canterbury

    On 7 February 2018 a large group of people witnessed Mayor Liane Dalziel re-open the Old Stone House in Canterbury. The Building is a monument to resilience having survived both fire and earthquakes.

    It also represents a key part of Canterbury's history. The Christchurch Suburb of Cashmere, where the building is located, takes its name from the estate of Sir John Cracroft, who, after a career in the East India company, retired to New Zealand and named his farm after Kashmir.

  • Celebrating diversity on International Mother Language Day

    Image of Mercury staff front row seated and back row standing in front of tables.

    Energy company Mercury has nearly 300 people in its Greenlane office, and this month it celebrated the strong diversity in its team on International Mother Language Day.

    The day celebrated the 20 or more ethnic groups within the Commercial Operations team; the people who make sure Mercury’s customers are well looked-after.

  • An emerging leader, Siona Fernandes - a young Olympian gives back

    Born in the Goa, India. Siona Fernandes was raised in a vibrant culture of diverse, values, practices and beliefs. She left home at 15 to pursue a dance career (she is a PhD scholarship recipient) and shortly after moved with her family to New Zealand. Siona’s own personal experience as a migrant in New Zealand has shaped her understanding of how culture influences the role of the body in wellbeing. In Goa the geographic layout of neighbourhoods promotes social interaction creating more opportunities for incidental movement such as walking, visiting, and group play. Upon arriving in New Zealand Siona noted that this level of incidental movement disappeared from the lives of many Indian migrants.